10 Chosen Scenes from Frankenstein (1910) and White Zombie (1932)

There are three scenes from Frankenstein, and seven scenes from White Zombie.

Photobucket

This scene is from Frankenstein. I think it looks interesting because it has foreground, middle ground, and background. Moreover, the line of the wall is almost parallel with the screen. Also, there is no cut to other angle at all. It is hard to find this kind of scene in modern movies.

Photobucket

In this scene, we can see Frankenstein’s room. There are lots of things in the room which give us ideas what kind of person Frankenstein is. We should do the same when designing Sombat’s room.

Photobucket

The use of negative space is very good in this scene. We should not forget about it when designing.

Photobucket

This scene is from White Zombie. This scene has many characters, however, we know which person to focus on. The are uses of line of sight, negative spaces, and rule of third.
Photobucket

With the use of the man’s shadow, it makes this scene looks very interesting to me. The camera angle also makes this scene looks more dramatic. It also has a foreground on the left.
Photobucket

This scene use the rule of third very well. First, we look at the zombie on the right. Then the man at the back. It gives us an idea of contradiction between the man at the back and the ones working. We get the idea that the man on the back has a higher level than the working ones even that man has lesser spaces in the screen.
Photobucket

The position of the graves is very well arranged. This can be our reference in adding details to a scene.

Photobucket

This scene looks tense because we cannot see everything in the scene as the foreground is blocking our sight. It is a good reference for a tension building scene.

Photobucket

When I saw this scene, I think about the Zombie World. I think this scene can be a good reference for it.

Photobucket

I pick this scene also because it can be a good reference for our Zombie World.

::::

That’s all for today.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Reference. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s